nevertrump, Lincoln project, republicans against trump

The new Jeremiahs: #NeverTrump and the rise of the Lincoln Project

Column
Robert Moore
24/06/2020
5 minutes to read

Over the past several weeks a new force has emerged in the 2020 US presidential election, one that has already reshaped the ecology of political communication in America—even as it has received relatively scant coverage in the US media, and almost none in Europe. 

Over the past several weeks a new force has emerged in the 2020 US presidential election, one that has already reshaped the ecology of political communication in America—even as it has received relatively scant coverage in the US media, and almost none in Europe. 

The coronavirus, the attention economy and far-right junk news

Column
Ico Maly
24/03/2020
9 minutes to read

The coronavirus has devastating consequences for social life in all corners of the world. For some, this global pandemic is an opportunity to reach a wide audience, to make money or to further a political agenda. 

Hashtag activism in the online-offline continuum

Hashtag tactics: Algorithmic activism in Chile

Column
Juan Eduardo Bonnin
09/03/2020
7 minutes to read

Algorithmic activism requires handcrafted tactics to reinforce the online-offline continuum of political actions. We can see it at work in the first week of protests in Chile.

Pelosi-Trump, October 2019 meeting

Pelosi and Trump: Choreographies of conflict

Column
Jan Blommaert
03/03/2020
10 minutes to read

Pelosi and Trump don't get along too well. A number of emblematic pictures document this conflict, and in each of them concrete body movements are sensed to tell the story.

Deseggregation,

On racism and how to read Hannah Arendt

Column
Ana Deumert
27/02/2020
8 minutes to read

In this column Ana Deumert looks at the work of Hannah Arendt. She asks how scholars can engage with her work, given the persistent presence of racist tropes in her writings.

big tech, AI, social big tech, society

Let’s talk about big tech (no, not you)

Column
Linnet Taylor
25/02/2020
4 minutes to read

In her first Diggit column, Linnet Taylor (Tilburg University) makes the case that big tech has a consent problem and that researchers should address the lumpy, inconvenient, political reality of big tech.

The (pseudo)science of profiling and surveillance

Column
Piia Varis
20/02/2020
9 minutes to read

Both online profiling and targeting as well as border surveillance are big business, but both also seem to rely on dubious scientific claims and foundations.

gravedigging, digital shaming, digital gravedigging, social media celebrities

Online gravedigging, identity and privacy

Column
Mingyi Hou
18/02/2020
11 minutes to read

This article analyzes gravedigging as a digital practice, and illustrates its roles in online shaming and celebrity image management activities.

Debates on populism and diversity

The monolingual bias in studies on populism

Column
Juan Eduardo Bonnin
06/02/2020
4 minutes to read

Scholarly articles written in English about populism often forget linguistic and discursive diversity.  Drawing from a monolingual tradition, they tend to overlook linguistic and discursive diversity in the political processes they study.

identity politics, race, conservatives

Conservative critiques of identity politics as divisive

Column
Rosalyn Negrón
21/01/2020
11 minutes to read

Rosalyn Negron unpacks the logics that underlie conservative critiques of left identity politics and zooms in on the specific significance of this discursive frame among conservatives.

Elisabeth Warren

Elisabeth Warren, clickbait and truth

Column
Jan Blommaert
20/01/2020
6 minutes to read

Elisabeth Warren's statement on her male contenders being "electoral losers" enables us to examine the ways in which clickbait actually works.

Trumps Tweetopoetics

Column
Jan Blommaert
17/01/2020
6 minutes to read

Trump speaks in tweets. But his tweets are made for speaking too.

Twitter politics

Twitter politics: the next stage

Column
Jan Blommaert
14/01/2020
6 minutes to read

Two recent incidents on Twitter in the wake of the US attack on Iran's general Soleimani show us how Twitter continues to define politics as we know it.