immigration

Integration Netherlands Dutch

Revisiting the 2013 Dutch Integration Law

Article
Boudewijn Henskens
27/04/2020
11 minutes to read

The DIY philosophy the state promotes for those who want to integrate in Dutch society has resulted in a 50% decrease in those who pass the exams in the regular timeframe. What has the policy's role been in this? 

Pauline Hanson, a good ol’ Aussie 


Article
Bin Chen
25/01/2019
8 minutes to read

Australia has seen Hanson call Islam a disease and belittle Asians for not assimilating and forming ghettos instead. In this essay, Bin Chen looks into the xenophobic discourse Hanson used on ethnic minorities in Australia.

farage, migration, immigration

How Nigel Farage speaks about immigration

Article
Eveline van der Weijden
08/11/2019
17 minutes to read

In this article, Nigel Farage's discourse and Social Media posts are analysed with regards to his and his former party's (UKIP) stance on immigration.

On the Bride's Side: sharing the refugee's journey

Column
Thao Nguyen
02/10/2017
6 minutes to read

The documentary is both a bold political statement and a direct experience of European borders that helps to shape a more positive attitude toward refugees.

Learn Dutch or Leave the Country?

Column
Han Dou
09/10/2017
3 minutes to read

Eurpean nations are using their own nation language as the threshold to define what it means to be “one of us”. Relevant language policies in integration tests are far from embracing multiculturalism, but ones that feed intolerance and prejudice.

25 years of right wing extremism in Belgium

Article
Jan Blommaert
25/09/2017
9 minutes to read

The Brexit, followed by election of Donald Trump in the US , have raised worldwide concerns about the rise of right wing extremism. The phenomenon is, however, 25 years old in Belgium. Lessons can be drawn from that longitudinal experience.

Boudaries

Criminalizing the innocent

Paper
Jip Bierkens
01/09/2016
10 minutes to read

This article elaborates on the current process of crimmigration in Dutch society. When crime and immigration become interwoven, the government might have more to do with it than immigrants themselves.