Art and globalization

This article is written as part of one of the courses of the BA Online Culture: Art, Media and Society or the MA Online Culture at Tilburg University. Click on the link for more info on the courses and the programme.

In this international Bachelor’s program Online Culture: Art, Media and Society (Culture Studies) the focus is on digital culture and (new) media. From disciplines such as cultural studies and media studies you study how digitalization and globalization influence our way of living. You discuss new ways of communication, art expressions as well as (social) media expressions like memes and trolls. You research how such ways of communication and expressions are established and how they manifest in, and have influence on a society that increasingly takes place online. Additionally, you actively contribute to digital culture by writing papers and opinion pieces for our own online platform Diggit Magazine.

This article seeks to explorer the way in which world politics appear in local music.

Pop music and Trump: World politics in local popular music

Paper
Renske Jacobs
17/08/2020
14 minutes to read

Globalization has changed the production of music. In this paper, we explore the way in which world politics appear in local music and how audiences engage with this, through two case studies of songs by De Staat and The 1975.

Mongolian folk metal: Between global and local

Article
Carmen Gabriela Lupu
24/04/2020
10 minutes to read

Mongolian folk metal is the unique mixture of Mongolian throat singing with metal riffs. In this paper, I analyze how Mongolian folk metal represents both the global metal community and Mongolian folklore by examing the band The Hu. 

network, sense8, netflix

What Sense8 teaches us about the network society

Article
Nadine Visser
02/10/2019
8 minutes to read

The series Sense8 is interesting in the context of globalization because it presents a lot of the aspects of a network society. This article analyses the link between the series and a network society.

Yinka Shonibare’s art as an expression of hybrid identity

Article
Fleur Aarts
06/02/2019
10 minutes to read

Yinka Shonibare plays with his hybrid identity as a British-Nigerian artist. In this analysis of 'The Swing', his layered cultural identity shines through. 

batman, patriarchy

Why you should think twice before getting your kid Batman toys

Column
Jules van Iperen
28/11/2018
6 minutes to read

By making us sympathize with billionaire Batman, the superhero genre does a marvelous job in legitimizing powerful neoliberal politicians and American hegemony.