Brazil

bolsonaro, brazil, fires amazone, digital populism, algorithmic populism

Bolsonaro's Brazil

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In the second half of 2018, Brazil faced one of its most polarized presidential elections. Since Bolsonaro took office, the world has been trying to make sense of Bolsonaro's Brazil. Fake News, Memes, WhatsApp Groups, the Amazon fires and Bolsonaro's populism: somehow it is all connected. Diggit Magazine tries to digg deeper into contemporary Brazilian political evolutions. 

Bolsonara, Brazil, populism, amazon fires

The Amazon fires as talking to Bolsonaro

Article
Daniel Silva
10/10/2019
16 minutes to read

According to Daniel Silva, the Amazon Fires can best be considered as political talk: as digitally formatted practices trying to communicate with Bolsonaro. 

(De) constructing Jair Bolsonaro’s presidential campaign

Article
Ulisses Sawczuk da Silva
30/09/2019
15 minutes to read

Bolsonaro has harnessed new and legacy media in building an image of authenticity. This sucessful media strategy has helped catapult him to the presidency, despite his tendency towards offensive statements and hyper nationalism. 

Jair Bolsonaro

Big Man politics 2.0

Column
Jan Blommaert
22/11/2018
5 minutes to read

Big Man politics used to be an exotic and marginal phenomenon, but algoritmic populists such as Bolsonaro, Trump, Orbán and others made it one of the dominant formats of 21st century power.

This Brazilian newspaper decided to stop posting on Facebook

Column
Gabriela de la Vega
01/11/2018
4 minutes to read

Folha de Sao Paulo decides to stop posting on Facebook after the guideline change in order to stop the proliferation of fake news, but is this decision really what is best for the country's fragile democratic situation?

Meat is weak: why we should consider veganism

Column
Lucas Pascholatti
25/11/2019
8 minutes to read

This column disscusses the meat industry, the consequences of advertising meat consumption and the necessity of vegetarianism.

When the law comes out of the barrel of the gun (Graham Denyer Willis)

Review
Paul Mutsaers
26/10/2016
5 minutes to read

The book is a product of intense ethnographic labor that took place in São Paulo, that Brazilian megacity where crime and violence run rampant and where routinized killing takes place involving police and an organized crime groups