Marcuse's grave, cultural marxism, hoax, conspiracy theory new right

Why has Cultural Marxism become the enemy?

13 minutes to read
Column
Jan Blommaert
10/11/2018

In the colossal manifesto Anders Behring Breivik wrote before killing sixty-plus members of a Norwegian social-democratic youth organization in 2011, "Cultural Marxists" are a prominent category of "traitors". It is due to the Quisling-esque sellout to the enemy by this overrepresented elite that Europe is now threatened by a genocidal Islamic Jihad, to be perpetrated by the millions of Muslims who immigrated into European countries - so it reads. Consequently, they deserve the death penalty, and Breivik executed more than sixty of them.

Cultural Marxism: the monster

Admittedly, Breivik was an eccentric and a freak even by the standards of ultra-radical European nationalists. But the logic of his ideological constructions is more widely shared and features as a template for fractions of the New Right in Europe and beyond. And the phrase "Cultural Marxism", still rather marginal in 2011, has in the meantime become a stock term in political debate and in neoconservative writings, and it has precisely the meaning it had in Breivik's manifesto. In the words of an American organization called "Western Mastery",

"Cultural Marxism has become the cultural branch of globalism. The enormous impact of this ideology on Western culture cannot be understated. It has effectively demolished societal structures and propagated cultural perversion. It has created a society that is racially mixed but extremely politically divided, sexually promiscuous, abrasive, hedonistic, and flat-out bizarre."

So: what is this monster? And why has it become such an enemy of the Right?

Silly old Marcuse

When Cultural Marxism is described in such writings (and Breivik's manifesto can serve as an example once more), fingers are pointed in two directions: to Antonio Gramsci and to the Frankfurt School. While Gramsci's role is somewhat ambivalent - he is implicitly hailed as the inventor of metapolitics, and his strategies have been widely adopted in conservative and New Right politics - the Frankfurt School is usually presented as guilty of a long list of charges. It was the Marxist approach to mass culture developed by Adorno that provoked the "cultural perversion" mentioned in the fragment above, because Adorno exposed the bourgeois foundations of what we generally perceive as beauty and quality.

And as for Herbert Marcuse, his "Eros and Civilization" is presented as a frontal attack on the robustly patriarchal and heterosexual Western sexual order, and the harbinger of the "sexually promiscuous, abrasive, hedonistic and flat-out bizarre" characteristics of contemporary Western social life - where abortion, divorce, and equal rights for LGBT people are legally inscribed in the mainstream. Marcuse destroyed (single-handedly, it seems) the age-old structures of authority in family life, in the system of education, in sexual partnership, and he really is the bad guy in stories of this kind. The more since he apparently had an "enormous impact on Western culture".

Marcuse single-handedly destroyed the age-old structures of authority in family life, in the system of education, in sexual partnership, and he really is the bad guy in stories of this kind.

One could, of course, spend ages offering factual refutations of almost everything said and written about this representation of "Cultural Marxism" and its enormous influence. But conspiracy theories, even when dressed up in the fancy clothes of academic discourse, are "reasonable" but not rational, and even require an outright disqualification of rationality as the foundation of their plausibility.

Even so, Marcuse and his fellow Marxists definitely receive way too much credit for the perceived decay of sexual morals and patriarchal structures. It would be quite "reasonable" for those who blame Cultural Marxism to simply Google "Benjamin Spock" and the "Kinsey Reports" - American sources firmly grounded in the Liberal tradition (not that of Marx), and arguably vastly more influential in the post WW2 Western world than the works of Adorno and Marcuse. Blaming the latter for causing everything that is detested by neoconservatives is a clear case of convenient overkill. And now we can move on to more serious issues.

The cultural branch of globalism

In his address to the UN General Assembly in late September 2018, President Trump declared "the end of the ideology of globalism" and welcomed the "doctrine of patriotism" - a doctrine of "mind your own business". I'll return to his interesting choice of words in a moment; for now we can observe that it is exactly this element - the rejection of globalism - that unites Breivik and Trump, Orban and Le Pen, Brexit and Wilders. Globalism is the real enemy, for it presupposes a degree of democratic egalitarianism (the liberty and fraternity of the French Republic and the "all men are born equal" of the American one). And it comes with things such as immigration and sociocultural and political diversity, solidarity with people elsewhere in the world, respect for transnational agreements and loyalty in international cooperation in systems such as that of the EU, the UN and NATO. Taken together, the term "globalism" is the umbrella for everything that is wrong in the eyes of the actors just listed. And all of them militantly promote "patriotism" and its associated lexical field: "nationalism", "sovereignty", "independence" and "liberty".

Globalism is the real enemy, for it presupposes a degree of democratic egalitarianism. It is the umbrella for everything that is wrong in the eyes of the actors just listed.

Trump interestingly qualifies globalism as an "ideology", and he uses the latter term here as "false consciousness", as a flawed and distorted representation of reality propagated by ideologues. Ideology, when used in this sense, opens a frame in which terms such as "brainwashing", "thought control", "propaganda" and, more recently, "political correctness" co-occur. And here, of course, we encounter the Cultural Marxists once more.

In Breivik's manifesto, the term Cultural Marxists is very often accompanied by and equated with "Leftists" (of course), with "multiculturalists" and, curiously, "feminists". Who is guilty of allowing these millions of Jihadists-in-spe into our countries? Yes, the Cultural Marxists are, for it is their "enormous influence" that spawned feminism, which then, in turn (due to, one can read, the softer side of femininity), has made our societies weaker and less confident.

And Cultural Marxism is, in itself, a "multiculturalist" project in which the venerable traditions and canons of our Western cultures are critically questioned, deconstructed, ridiculed and denied the solid superiority they used to have. Cultural Marxists, and by extension the entire Left, are in essence postmodern "relativists" (another bad word in these kinds of discourse universe), and their relativism has led to the present threat of cultural, political, and ultimately physical genocide. They have successfully detached the people from their sociocultural roots, and this is a capital crime in Breivik's eyes.

Cosmopolitan precursors

There are precedents for this, and they are not the most pleasant ones. The meanings now covered by the terms related to Cultural Marxism were at several moments in the 20th century covered by the term "cosmopolitan". In Nazi Germany, cosmopolitanism was seen as the opposite of "German-ness", and it was very often used to describe the supposed innate characteristics of Jewish people. The Jews were described as people lacking roots in the German "Volk" and in the Aryan race; due to that, they could not be assumed to be politically loyal to Germany and bore the suspicion of cultural and racial "pollution" - which motivated the Nuremberg Laws of 1935 as well as the "Final Solution".

The meanings now covered by the terms related to Cultural Marxism were at several moments in the 20th century covered by the term "cosmopolitan".

The term cosmopolitanism was also used in Nazi propaganda to connect the Jews to Bolshevism, or, slightly reformulated, the foreigner to the Left. The argument was that the Soviet revolution was led by Jews (such as Trotsky, Kamenev and Zinoviev), and that the ensuing international work of the COMINTERN was part of a Jewish strategy to achieve global power. The Jews had invented Bolshevism so as to lure others into a mass movement which was meant to make them the rulers of the world, in short. Since the COMINTERN also influenced communist and socialist parties in Germany and elsewhere, the connection between Jews, German left-wing political opponents and foreign interference in German politics could be conveniently made. The Reichstag fire of 1933 was blamed on underground COMINTERN agents and led to the political purge of the German Left. German socialists and communists were the first inmates of Dachau. The Left, so it was explained, could never be "patriotic" because of its allegiance to political internationalism - remember "proletarians of all countries, unite!"

For Stalin, the proletarians of all countries were just fine, but those of the Soviet Union needed to be, above all, "patriotic" - loyal to Stalin and embodying the values of the Stalinist Soviet Union. In 1946, the Zhdanov Doctrine was introduced, forcing artists, intellectuals and scientists into a straitjacket of what would now be called "political correctness". Jewish intellectuals were a particular target of the enforcement of this doctrine, for (in an echo of Nazi propaganda) the Jews were suspected of "rootless cosmopolitanism", of a preference for influences and developments "from elsewhere" lacking (and thus betraying or sabotaging) the true character of the Soviet Union and its culture. Here, too, cosmopolitanism was seen as a threat to power, stability and sociocultural tradition, and people whose profession invites an openness to such influences (think of, precisely, artists, scientists and intellectuals) were identified as prime targets for repression. Interestingly, such targets were often accused of political alignment with ... Leftism: Trotskist, anarchist or social-democratic inclinations, i.e. foreign influences at odds with the views of the Soviet, "patriotic" variety of socialism.

What's left of Cultural Marxism?

There is, we can observe, a long discourse tradition in which the present attacks on Cultural Marxism fit. But let us now return to the 21st century.

It is hard not to see reflections of the 20th century "rootless cosmopolitan Jew" in the ways in which the American-Hungarian billionaire George Soros is represented in current political discourse in Hungary. Soros - not a man of the Left by any standards - fell out with Viktor Orban over the Hungarian stance towards refugees in 2015. What followed was an avalanche of accusations in which the "cosmopolitan" Soros was accused of interference into Hungarian domestic politics through the transnational institutions and NGO's he controlled. In other words, his "globalism" was attacked from within the "patriotism" which is Hungary's current doctrine, and the trigger for the attack was that prototypical 21st century icon of "globalism": migration. In passing: for exactly the same reason - migration - Soros also became the target of Trump's anger in late 2018.

The Hungarian backlash against Soros quickly focused on the usual suspects: intellectuals. The Central European University in Budapest, one of Soros' transnational institutions described as "a bastion of Liberalism", came under threat of closure. In the same move, the gender studies program at one of Hungary's leading universities lost its accreditation. As explained by a leading Hungarian politician

“We must raise awareness to the fact that these programs are doing nothing to lift up our nation. In fact, they are destroying the values-centered mode of thinking that is still present in the countries of Central Europe".

It is highly unusual for the government of an EU member state to interfere in what used to be called "academic freedom", and the measure met severe criticism internationally. Orban, however, remained unperturbed even when the EU threatened Hungary with unprecedented sanctions. In his view, cheered on by the likes of Nigel Farage, the EU should stop preventing its member countries from using their sovereign powers. The EU, in short, is way too "globalist" an institution, an alien body that should not take the place of "patriotic" national governments.

We can see, through this example, that the trope of the Cultural Marxists as sole, or main, agents of "globalism" is in actual fact a canard of considerable size. Soros is not a Cultural Marxist; there is, in fact, little evidence that he has ever been influenced by any form of Marxism. He is a cosmopolitan entrepreneur, though, whose reach of activities is global - but in a very different sense than the one intended by Marx and Engels when they wrote "proletarians of all countries, unite!" 

The trope of the Cultural Marxists as sole, or main, agents of "globalism" is in actual fact a canard of considerable size.

The same goes for the EU, of which one can say all sorts of things but not that it is a vehicle for Cultural Marxism. I invite critical readers to, for instance, consult the texts of the EU Commission's Horizon 2020 program and identify fundable topics in which we detect the "enormous influence" of, for instance, "Eros and Civilization".  And as for immigration, I welcome (critically though) analyses in which the German employers' repeated emphasis on the necessity of a qualified labor force of refugees (including Muslims, ladies and gentlemen) to maintain the German economy's growth rate can be turned into a Breivikian Leftist conspiracy to weaken Europe and its peoples.

Roger Scruton, in a more civilized argument than that of Breivik, might view these German employers as "xenophiles" - people who have a preference for foreign cultures and who are, vice versa, "oikophobic", displaying an aversion of what is ours. "Xenophilia" is yet another term we can add to "globalism" and "cosmopolitism": it's the wrong kind of openness to the world. But the flaw in the argument is obvious: according to Scruton and his followers, xenophilia is typically a Leftist attitude, incompatible with that of, say, Orban, Farage or Baudet. Yet, it appears compatible to that of international entrepreneurs such as George Soros or the management of Siemens and Volkswagen. Or such as Angela Merkel and the EU Council, for immigration is very much regulated by governments, not by Cultural Marxists writing books and holding speeches. As advocates and agents of immigration and political Liberalism, all those unlikely xenophiles appear to stand on the left of Cultural Marxism these days.

Globalism and globalization

We can see that the argument connecting Cultural Marxism to all that is wrong with the present Western world when seen from a Right-wing or conservative viewpoint is terrifically muddled and incoherent. It's an easy shot: connect your political opponent (the Left) to the lack of national political agency due to international collaboration systems ("globalism") and a racialized, ethnicized or culturalized and moralized version of a national utopia (polluted by migration and threatened by Muslims, feminists and LGBT people), and you have a discursive template that enables you to explain everything while actually addressing nothing. It's a political-discursive passe-partout, reasonable for those willing to believe it, but profoundly irrational.

The latter was demonstrated by President Trump himself. Shortly after solemnly declaring the end of "globalism", he called upon the UN Security Council (one of the great fora of post-WW2 "globalism", if you wish) to back the US sanctions against Iran. Thus, his new doctrine can be reformulated as "mind your own business, while I'll mind everyone else's", and transnationalism hasn't yet left the building.

President Trump's new doctrine can be reformulated as "mind your own business, while I'll mind everyone else's", and transnationalism hasn't yet left the building.

Part of the incoherence is the confusion of a fuzzy and highly elastic term such as "globalism" with a highly precise and concrete concept such as "globalization". Globalization is the development of a worldwide system of cooperation, mutual influence, exchange and interaction, and it has "hard" economic and political dimensions as well as "soft" cultural and ideological ones. People such as Soros, the Siemens and Volkswagen managers and the EU leadership are very much in the business of "hard" globalization, and so is President Trump. But both dimensions cannot be easily separated, for an important part of that "hard" globalization is a global industry of "soft" cultural and ideological commodities. (This, one should note, is the decisive insight of the Frankfurt School's Cultural Marxists).  Rupert Murdoch's worldwide media empire is a major actor in it, and while this empire makes quite a bit of "hard" money, it also considerably influences the "soft" cultural and ideological aspects of societies included in the empire. Mr Zuckerberg's Facebook-Twitter-etc. industry does the same. If there is any real "enormous impact on Western culture", it should be sought with its real actors, not with those who merely analyzed it. And if we look for the "cultural branch of globalism" (or, more precisely, globalization), perhaps we should look in that direction are well.

So why is the so-called "globalism" of so-called Cultural Marxist such an enemy? Perhaps the - paradoxical - answer can be found in globalization. Immanuel Wallerstein, one of the most insightful scholars of globalization, described years ago how globalized capitalism required a multiplicity of individual states, so that unfavorable business conditions in one state could be played off against favorable ones offered by other states. Large interstate systems or agreements - think of the EU now - can be favorable for business because they shape large markets; but they can become unfavorable because they would have the power to impose and enforce constraints, regulations and restrictions across that large market. The latter tendency is what "globalism" stands for in President Trump's speech: it's a rejection of multilateral economic regulation, to be replaced by "patriotism" - a monopoly over regulation in one's own country.

Wallerstein also described how, in conditions of increasing globalization, culture would become the major battlefield. It is through the use of culture as an argument that individual states can make arguments in favor of protecting their own scope of agency and refuse or minimize more far-reaching forms of transnational integration. The process is cyclical, Wallerstein argues: phases of increasing integration (and, typically, of economic growth) would be accompanied by emphases on universalism, while phases of decreasing integration (and, typically, of economic recession) would be accompanied by emphases on racism and sexism. 

We are far removed here from Leftist xenophilia and oikophobia, from "globalism" versus "patriotism" and from Cultural Marxists-multiculturalists-feminists. We're in a world here of pretty robust historical facts. I would invite people to, at least, explore them, for looking at the hard facts of globalization and its effects can be massively helpful in addressing the catastrophically twisted ideas of people such as Breivik.